Juul-commissioned study reinforces relative safety of vaping emissions


An advocacy group campaigning on behalf of vaping companies and users said it was not surprised by a study showing that emissions from e-cigarettes are much less harmful that second hand smoke from traditional cigarettes.

Vaping industry leader Juul commissioned the study, and revealed the results at a conference on nicotine in Europe earlier this month.

The study, which involved just 30 people, found that e-cigarette emissions contained 99 per cent less formaldehyde and carbon monoxide than those that came from normal cigarettes.

Alex Clark, chief executive of the Consumer Advocates for Smoke-free Alternatives Association (CASAA), said the study results were not surprising.

“CASAA funded a study on e-liquid products involving 9,000 observations and it found … there was no cause for concern to exposure,” Clark told Tobacco News Wire.

The study used standards laid down by the Occupational Health and Safety Administration, Clark said.

On the broader question of whether businesses should allow vaping, Clark argued his organization's position is “more nuanced.”

“Owners should have the choice to allow or prohibit,” he said.

Details of Juul's study were presented at the recent Global Forum on Nicotine in Poland. The study, carried out by a third party though funded by the company, showed that the emissions from vaping was much less dangerous than second hand smoke.

“These products pose substantially less risk when it comes to secondhand emissions than cigarettes,” Josh Vose, vice president of medical and clinical affairs at Juul, said in an interview with CNBC.

“There are roughly 50,000 people that die every year in the U.S. from exposure to secondhand smoke, and this could potentially help bend that curve.”

The broadcaster noted that the study was one of seven clinical trials commissioned by Juul ahead of applying for Food and Drug Administration approval for its products.

Organizations in this Story

JUUL Labs, Inc.

More News

Tobacco News Wire